Reviews

An intimate work, moving and profound, with outstanding performances by Oded Ronen and Ligal Melamed Reaching beyond the individual, it has an almost mythological feel. …a performance space that dares you to bare your soul in front of an attentive audience. Oded Ronen’s work investigates the most abstract concepts – identity, self, self & other, relationships, community, beliefs – in the most visceral, physical way. Taking apart and constructing, destroying and building, exploring the mythology of relationships, Capsule is a riveting emotional experience, marked by beauty and mystery.
Ayelet Dekel, Midnight East
Capsule is an intimate work with an outstanding performance which combines the most abstract concepts of identity, self, relationships, community and beliefs. It throws light on the essence of peace and how nonviolent co-existence ensures the survival of humanity. Even though it was a dance production, it painted a telling picture of the process of peace building.
Business Ghana
The piece is philosophical… it encompasses diverse notions including identity, relationships, community and beliefs among others. Employing classical virtuosity, they effectively combined contemporary sensibilities while unfolding a fascinating experience characterized by majesty and mystery. …equally about mutual discovery, tenderness and ecstasy that are beautifully articulated through the choreography. Undeniably, a great deal of energy emanated from the stage as the dancers moved with amazing ease.
John Owoo, Arts Ghana
…the piece is intense and carries passages of beautiful slow and sustained movement as well as more chaotic moments. [Bringing] synergy with a thought provoking and elegiac choreography carried out with unflagging energy and power of performers. …by far the standout performance of the night.
Rachel Nouchi, London Dance
While the movement is often graceful and athletic, the sense of flaw, of something not quite right, pervades this excellent piece. …as if to show the mending has been in vain. A sombre and moving close to a marvellous piece of contemporary dance. Each dancer has a moment to break away from the group into an energetic solo; like a body packed with energy it is struggling, desperately, to control… The central piece, and the standout piece of the night, is Oded Ronen’s “Kintsugi”.
Martin Thomasson, British Theatre Guide

… touching and discomforting.

…evoking strong and deep emotions for the viewer.

…shows that we all have the potential to be victims, or the opposite – criminals.

Dr. Lutz Behrens, Vogtland Anzeiger

…developed to highlight the purpose for building bridges to bring Ghana and Israel together. The piece also highlighted individual struggles and passion, and the collective power of working together. 

…the performance sought to promote community existence and international cohesion.

The Israeli Embassy in Ghana
The collective power of working together to build a bridge between two the cultures and …a language of movement that will connect between Israel and Ghana.
Ghana Web
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Oded Ronen: Capsule

By Ayelet Dekel

October 29, 2017

Oded Ronen’s Capsule shimmers with the clarity of water, sunlit tides touching the shores of a remote island, in its blue depths and hidden currents revealing something primal, essential. It is an intimate work, moving and profound, with outstanding performances by Oded Ronen and Ligal Melamed. Reaching beyond the individual, it has an almost mythological feel.

Capsule premiered in Tmuna Theatre’s International Festival, taking place in the Amphi. It’s a demanding venue, as in this space everything is out there, close enough to touch. It’s a performance space that dares you to bare your soul in front of an attentive audience. As people entered the theatre, preoccupied with finding a place to sit, the two dancers moved, entangled, writhing against the wall on the other side of the door.  Their movement suggesting a timelessness, as if we, the audience, have happened on something already in progress, perhaps something that began so long ago that its origins have been forgotten, something that will continue long after we all are gone.

Small, rectangular boxes randomly strewn, covered the floor, as the two dancers, entwined, moved slowly across the wall towards the corner of the room. Ambient sounds of birds and water evoke an Edenic scene. In their intricate, interconnected movement, they impede one another’s movement. Creating intriguing forms beautiful to behold as they interlock and block one another, the physical language emerges organically from the work’s themes.

The relationship of movement to concept is meticulously consistent throughout, with a vocabulary of imposed physical limitations embodying contradictions. In one sequence, Ligal dances with her arms pinned to her knees at the elbow, an almost impossible and certainly awkward position to maintain, yet resulting in images of surprising grace and beauty. Oded is a powerful dancer of muscular elegance. As a choreographer, he resists here the temptation of showcasing his talents; harnessing them to express the complexities of content, and empowering the work.

Almost imperceptibly, a process begins, as crawling on their bellies in a primordial mode, they alternate pushing away the boxes with their heads and bodies. Then, they rise up to stand, lifting one of the boxes between them, balanced on their chins. Moving boxes using their bodies and arms, yet never gripping with their hands, they build something that appears to be a wall, with all its accompanying associations. Are they keeping something in or keeping something out? Is this wall a protection or a limitation? Is it all of these things and more? There is a strong sense of origins, of the process of becoming, in the movement of this work. In the dancer’s gaze one recognizes a reflective curiosity, as if, in movement they are discovering and exploring the possibilities of the body and its motion. And all the while, the boxes are manipulated, moved into position. Something is being constructed, coming into being.

Curiosity, tenderness, violence, fear, and despair – embodied in a work of grace and strength, and ultimately, reflected upon with a sense of perspective infused with humor. It’s a work of extremes: the two are either entangled, each unable to move without the other, each unable to move because of the other; or else entirely apart. Much of the action is grounded, literally taking place on or close to the floor, or else anchored on one of the walls. Until, towards the end, after a scene of ruin and devastation, there is a sense of surrender and exhaustion that grows into something tender. The soft, slow, tangle of movement is suddenly writ large, in the center of the floor, with leaps and lifts as the dancers take and give movement to one another in a surge of energy.

Oded Ronen’s work investigates the most abstract concepts – identity, self, self & other, relationships, community, beliefs – in the most visceral, physical way. Taking apart and constructing, destroying and building, exploring the mythology of relationships, Capsule is a riveting emotional experience, marked by beauty and mystery.

Oded Ronen: Capsule

Business Ghana

15th Mar 2019

Source: graphic.com.gh

Week of Dance Bridges: ‘Capsule’ promotes peace in the world

MUSIC and dance have been proven to be effective tools for communicating and on Monday, March 11, patrons who were at the Efua Sutherland Studios at the University of Ghana’s School of Performing Arts were treated to a performance titled Capsule, meant to promote world peace.

A contemporary Israeli duet, Capsule is an intimate work with an outstanding performance which combines the most abstract concepts of identity, self, relationships, community and beliefs.

Performed by Oded Ronen – who is also the choregrapher – and Ligal Melamed, it was the first in a series of activities for the maiden Israel-Ghana Week of Dance Bridges, organised by the Embassy of Israel and the Dance Department of the University of Ghana.

In today’s chaotic world, Capsule is a very relevant piece as it throws light on the essence of peace and how nonviolent co-existence ensures the survival of humanity.

Even though it was a dance production, it painted a telling picture of the process of peace building and how people cannot live successfully without support from others.

Capsule drives home the point that the world will not be a happy place for anyone if people didn’t belong to a home, family, country or political parties.


Explaining the concept to Graphic Showbiz later, Oded Ronen said Capsule, first performed at the Tmuna International Festival in Israel in 2017, explains how people use capsules (medicine) to cure their illnesses and the need for humans to exist interdependently to soothe each other’s pains and sorrows.

“A world where you eat alone, sleep alone, age alone, get sick alone, and where no one has your back is obviously not one that we seek and that is why Capsule advocates that we come together to build the world and make it a better place,” he said.

The Israeli Embassy hopes to create an atmosphere of commonalities between Israeli and Ghanaian culture, hence, the institution of the dance week which captures four major dance activities.

An Israeli-Ghanaian Dance Workshop was held on Tuesday, March 12 and explored traditions through the art of dance, a learning experience of traditional Israeli folklore dance and its origins.

A Dance Film Screening on Thursday, March 14 will examine the interrelation between two phenomena of 20th century modern dance especially German modern dance and Zionism, the evolution of the Israeli society.

The Week of Dance Bridges will be climaxed on Saturday, March 16, and it is a joint project between the Israeli choreographer, Oded Ronen and various Ghanaian dance groups.

Various individuals and groups from Israel and Ghana are participating in the Week of Dance Bridges and include Oded Ronen, Ligal Melamed, Ofer Lachish, the University of Ghana Dance Department, Chen Laimer, National Dance Company, Ghana Dance Ensemble, the Great Africa Heritage Dance Ensemble and Nii Tetty Lebno Tetteh and the Kusun Ensemble.

Lead choreographer, Oded Ronen has performed with many Dance companies including Cedece Dance Company (Portugal) and Kolben Dance Company and Fesco Dabce Company both from Israel.

He has also created pieces for the Jerusalem Ballet, Bloomfield Science Museum, IntimaDance Festival, Kolben Dance Company and Humans in Motion (all in Israel).

Oded Ronen: Capsule

By John Owoo

15th Mar, 2019

Source: artsghana.org

Dance piece takes on abstract concepts

A compelling duet by Israeli dancers Oded Ronen and Ligal Melamed last week turned the ETS Drama Studio at the University of Ghana (Legon) into a dance groove, where agile bodies freely explored abstract issues and concepts.

Titled “Capsule”, the piece is a philosophical one with the two dancers exhibiting class and craft through restrained and composed movements. Indeed, it encompasses diverse notions including identity, relationships, community and beliefs among others.

With dozens of card boxes strewn across the stage, Ronen and Melamed employed rather sublime and tender body movements while constructing, assembling, destroying and exploring the mythology of relationships.

Interspersed with music by Ronen Kozokaro – arms, torsos, heads, hands and other body parts were constantly in motion. Employing classical virtuosity, they effectively combined contemporary sensibilities while unfolding a fascinating experience characterized by majesty and mystery.

Choreographed by Ronen, “Capsule” is equally about mutual discovery, tenderness and ecstasy that are beautifully articulated through the choreography. Undeniably, a great deal of energy emanated from the stage as the dancers moved with amazing ease from one sequence to the other.

In some instances they pick up the card boxes so gently it feels as if it embodies their soul – and other cases they just shuffle them around and dump them. In the end, they reassemble them in an upright and delicate manner as their bodies interchanged through expressive movements and gestures.

Earlier, choreographers / dancers Kofi Anthonio and Sena Atsugah enchanted the audience with a short piece titled “The Match”. With bodies moving in unison alongside subtle curves and tilts, they unveiled a sleek, compelling and moving piece that is equally visually stimulating.

The pair, who are also academics, vividly showcased the fact that their versatility as performers has grown with smart and unpredictable works in recent times. Indeed, they appeared to be full of freshness, calmness and zeal as they moved from one end of the stage to the other.

Accompanied by a choir from the Music Department, Anthonio and Atsugah, who are with the Department of Dance Studies, wove together an exhilarating order of movements as they exited the stage with grace and composure.

Present at the performance, which forms part of activities marking a project dubbed “Dance Bridges” include HE Shani Cooper Zubeida (Israeli Ambassador in Ghana), Prof. Kofi Agyekum (Dean of the School of Performing Arts) and Dr. Sylvanus Kuwor (Head, Department of Dance Studies).

Israeli Embassy in Accra organized “Dance Bridges”, which also encompassed lectures, workshops, film screenings and master classes in collaboration with the School of Performing Arts, University of Ghana, Legon.

Oded Ronen: Kintsugi

By Rachel Nouchi

6th June, 2017

Source: londondance.com

Transitions Dance Company - Triple bill - Laban Theatre

Tonight, Transitions Dance Company, featuring twelve ferociously talented dancers ready to launch their careers on the dance circuit, attacked performance with admirable raw passion and fervour in a night that offered a mixed choreographic triple bill ranging from the captivating to oddly surprising.

The evening opened with a simple, but effective piece based on highly original material from choreographer, Charles Linehan, whereby he employed film footage from drones using the dancers as subjects to create choreography. It was ‘the aerial perspective of this drone footage that influenced the choreographic arrangement in Nothing but Time,’ tonight’s piece, explains Linehan.

While this is a short sequence at 13 minutes, its playful construction employs the power of light and shadows on movement and asks how the moving body responds to this onstage thus building compelling choreography. The dancers responded readily to the challenges set within Linehan’s choreography and keenly observed the relationships between eachother in space and how configurations of such patterns-influenced by the Ariel footage-can be navigated and negotiated between each other.

Kintsugi, choreographed by Oded Ronen came next and was by far the standout performance of the night. The collaboration of a haunting musical score by Ronen Kozokaro featuring Maurice Ravel’s Kaddish, the Jewish mourning prayer, worked in synergy with a thought provoking and elegiac choreography carried out with unflagging energy and power of performers.

Are we watching an MRI scan of a heart pumping only to be attacked by rogue cells appearing to disrupt an even rhythm of the heartbeat or perhaps factory workers as part of the machine? Questions are open to the audience to interpret and choreographic prompts are both stimulating and deeply moving.

While the piece is intense and carries passages of beautiful slow and sustained movement as well as more chaotic moments, it’s also comic. At one point the cast spit out golden sawdust and the audience has no idea why or where it came from, but it feels like an undisclosed spiritual reference. The notes refer to the Japanese art of Kintsugi, the title of the piece.

The framework of the choreography is built around the use of breath in varying degrees of tempos, weights and intensity. This, in turn, changes weight and movement intentions of the performer. Here, self-conscious breathing from lightweight to heavily laden are focused on gathering and scattering as a troupe. In certain phrases, the dancers come together, breathing communally only to be torn apart.

Finally, the last piece of the evening, &, created by Cristian Durant is intriguing to say the least. Set to an arrhythmic electronic score by composer Tom Monterio, the choreographer ‘invites dancers to (re)visit and plunder their physical and conceptual memory bank,’ and ‘the audience is clearly implicated in the unfolding of this work, playing its part and defining the action.’

While the beginning works beautifully with dancers dressed in a rare assortment of clothes from vintage colourful jumpers to 70’s party outfits snaking around the stage in suspended movement as if in slow motion or underwater, the action moves into uncomfortable territory.

Once the dancers start to leave the stage and filter into the audience space, attempts to connect to the action become limited.

As dancers descend into fractured, jerky moves, crawling and writhing over the seats with wide-eyed menacing stares and snarls, I had to banish film clips from the comic thriller, Shaun of the Dead, from mind.

One performer had clearly been instructed to leave her mouth open in some strange grimace. Through no fault of the excellent young performers, none of this felt disquieting ‘bizarre’ or connecting – just a little empty.

It’s worth commending the strength and fortitude of the dancers who managed to stay within the zone. However, this only deterred from the desired effect. Trying to interact with the performers proved impossible, despite the brief, as they were totally committed to respective inner worlds.

Rather, as the dancers sidled up to the audience, sitting next to them and pawing the velvet seats – things quickly spiraled into a Thriller style version of contemporary dance.

Surely there are better ways to dissolve the space between performer and audience – if this was the intention – than literally crawling all over them.

Overall, a lively night with hugely commendable zest and energy coming from the tireless performers who made the most of every second onstage and readily took on and embraced some challenging passages of choreography wholeheartedly.

Rachel Nouchi is a movement researcher/practitioner based at Central School of Speech and Drama and contributes as an arts reviewer for UK based performances. 

Oded Ronen: Kintsugi

Transitions Dance Company

7 March, 2017

Source: britishtheatreguide

Charles Linehan, Oded Ronen and Cristian Duarte (choreographers)

Transitions Dance Company, under the artistic direction of David Waring, based at the Trinity Laban Conservatoire is a postgraduate dance company, performing for one night at Manchester Metropolitan University’s Crewe campus.

Tonight’s audience in a studio theatre at the Axis Arts Centre seems to be largely made up of students. Nice to see the students supporting the event, but this company deserves a larger stage and a broader audience.

The show opens with “Nothing but Time”, choreographed by Charles Linehan (it should be noted, the company is also credited with developing each piece in this evening’s programme).

Dressed (more or less) in everyday clothes, sometimes aggressively catapulting one another across the floor, sometimes constrained to small, subtle, hypnotically slow motions, the dancers’ bodies seem in this piece deliberately to exploit each other, rather than working as partners. There is a sense of unease and friction throughout.

Michael Mannion’s lighting, opening with a glaring, stand-mounted white floodlight, which gives way to subtle and subdued illumination, enhances Linehan’s work (based on research into drone technology). A moody and tantalising opening piece.

The performance closes with “&”, choreographed by Cristian Duarte. A lone dancer moves silently around the stage, twisting, turning, walking, rolling. When he pauses, he is surrounded by the other eleven members of the troupe, in a bizarre tableau vivant—fixed grins and silent, unnatural laughs.

From there, “&” reminds me of a scene from the Marat/Sade, only less menacing and without the aggressive sexuality of Peter Weiss’s play. The dancers contort and leap around the floor, all the while pulling a series of faces—smiling, leering, remonstrating, etc. This slightly edgy playfulness then spills over into the audience—hats, coats, bags and shoes are all fair game. This interaction unsettles some (one young couple looking distinctly ill-at-ease) but most take it in good part, as gentle, mischievous fun.

The central piece, and the standout piece of the night, is Oded Ronen’s “Kintsugi”. Kintsugi is the Japanese art of repairing broken crockery with a mix of resin and gold dust (or silver or platinum); the effect being to make the repaired object more of a treasure than before it broke. Irregular golden flashes across silver-grey tunics give Suzie Holmes’s costumes a cleverly subtle connection to the theme. Matthew Mannion’s lighting is at its best of the night; constant shifts in colour and orientation, enhancing and invigorating the visual experience.

All twelve Transitions dancers pack the stage for this often fierce and frantic creation; their passion and courage leading them to dare leaps and turns that a less surefooted troupe would baulk at, in what is a rather cramped space for so many performers.

While the movement is often graceful and athletic, the sense of flaw, of something not quite right, pervades this excellent piece. Sometimes, a dancer will pause, gently tapping his forehead or her chest—a motif gesture is the raising of the left arm, whilst tapping repeatedly at the rib cage just below the armpit. If these parts of the body begin to feel like areas of concern, this worry is soon given substance as one dancer begins to “leak” golden confetti, like a teddy bear losing her stuffing. Others suffer similar malfunctions—one “coughing” up gold dust, as if smitten by some terrible disease.

Each dancer has a moment to break away from the group into an energetic solo; like a body packed with energy it is struggling, desperately, to control—I pictured Pris’s demise in Blade Runner; grace, strength and skill, suddenly giving way to painful, awkward convulsions.

There is a tremendous climactic sequence in which the dancers split into two gangs, leaping and twisting with extraordinary energy and commitment, precision and synchronisation. This brief section is so powerful that my only criticism is that it should lead us to the finale. It feels like we are reaching the end, but we are not.

Nevertheless, the actual finale is powerful and moving (if ever so slightly, overdue). All the while, beneath the main action, dancers have broken away to attend to the gold confetti. In ones and twos, they sweep and scrape it together, attempting to mark out a jagged golden line. The effort seems futile, since the dancing feet or slithering bodies of others, often wipe away their work. However, at long last the golden zigzag of a kintsugi mend is illuminated on the dance floor, carving the stage in half. Is this, we wonder, a moment of triumph over all the woes they have suffered?

By now, eleven dancers are crowded stage right, seemingly queuing to exit. They gently tap not only their own “wounds” but those of their neighbours, concerned for each other’s afflictions. As the exit begins, a lone dancer is left behind. He writhes and twists across the golden healing join, scattering the gold dust, as if to show the mending has been in vain. A sombre and moving close to a marvellous piece of contemporary dance.

Transitions is a fine ensemble, but it would be wrong to say there are no stars in the company. In my view, the outstanding performer of the night is:

Bryn Aled, Marcus Alessandrini, Giannis Economides, Viva Foster, Becky Horne, Osian Meilir, Sean Murray, Srak Oakley, David Esteban Rodriguez, Sophie Tellings, Selene Travaglia, Jessica Walker.

If you get the chance to see them, grab it.

Reviewer: Martin Thomasson

Oded Ronen: Glashäuser

by Dr. Lutz Behrens

14 June, 2019

Source:
vogtland anzeiger

Glashäuser brings one to tears

Towards the end of the performance the theatre was empty and all viewers of the premiere, some with tears in their eyes, met again on the smaller stage of the theater in Plauen, Saxony. The ballet Glashäuser (translated Glass houses) by Israeli Choreographer Oded Ronen left a very strong impression.

 

On stage – three white define the borders of the stage, together with the white floor embrace the spartan and abstract vision of designer Silvio Motta, set and costume designer, as well as the video work in collaboration with Oded Ronen. The white background serves as a canvas for projection of different short films, evoking strong and deep emotions for the viewer, together with impressive music.

 

Also the eight female and male dancers (Judith Bohlen, Miyu Fukagawa, Shahnee Page, Justine Rouquart, Nicole Stroh, Juan Bockamp, Elliot Burke, Jeaho Shin(, are dressed in white suits, differentiated from each other only by black stripes. Different than them – the dancer Jeaho Shin, dressed in a suit, sits in a friendly manner in the audience in the first part of the work. He is among the group of six men and women who are randomly chosen and are asked, politely yet firmly, to sit on six chairs on wheels, dedicated to moving them around during the 80 minutes work, which creates intimacy with the dancers. The fact the Jeaho Shin afterwards takes off his suit to blend in with the rest of the dancers, shows that we all have the potential to be victims, or the opposite – criminals.

 

Ostracizing of another person, which can end with homicide, and being part of a specific group, are the subjects that Oded Ronen presents in his choreography, with convincing aesthetics and with changing and recurring variations, from a joyful dance in a circle to a harsh military march 

 

The show opens with touching and discomforting videos which concentrates in 3 short segments the disasters of the 20th century, Plauen serving as an example: The thriving city at the beginning of the 20th century (with its 105,000 inhabitants in 1905), continuing with the sortie of the allied forces bombers in the 2nd world war, dropping bombs on the city, destroying 75% of it by the end of the war.

Through parts of Smetana’s Moldova and cheerful Klezmer music incorporated in Mahler’s 1st symphony, along various other sound effects, Ronen finds a fitting way to express his ideas.  And every so often the music stops when female dancers recite different parts of national hymns.

The ambience becomes almost unbearable when a part of the Eichmann trial is projected, along the protocol on the floor in German. Hannah Arendt might have spoken of the banality of the embodiment of evil, yet here, Eichmann, as the accountant of death, gray and shrunken, shakenly sits on the accused bench awaiting his sentence. However the scene, where one of the witnesses collapses and is taken out of the courtroom, after he couldn’t take the unbearable memories, indicates the singularity of the German eliminatory anti-Semitic approach, and we are not talking about “bird droppings” (relates to a comment by Gauland, an AFD politician, which compared Hitler and the Nazi regime to a small stain in the context of the German history).

When looking at the printed program for the show and the dedication segment, the viewer can feel the magnitude of the horror: the double spread page serves as a belated dedication to Oded Ronen’s family of his mother’s side from Plauen, who were murdered in the holocaust. Next to each person’s cheerful photo from ordinary daily life, the shocking print: “murdered aged 2, 10, 14, 18” if only to name the children and teenagers.

Brecht said: Besser als gerührt sein ist, sich rühren, which means Better to get up and take action than only to be touched. Glashäuser  can contribute a lot in this aspect. And even if it is not to be anticipated the many of the AFD supporters (the extreme right wing party of Saxony) will come to this conclusion, for Plauen and its negative / damaged reputation since May 1st this year, this show came right on time.

Oded Ronen: Ye
Si
Gesher

18 March, 2019

Copyright: MFA Accra

Choreographer Oded Ronen with University of Ghana Dance Students

On Saturday, 16 March 2019, the Embassy of Israel climaxed its weeklong cultural dance festival, dubbed Israel-Ghana Dance Bridges week with a stunning performance titled “YE SI GESHER” (We built a Bridge).

This choreographic piece was the result of intense master class collaboration between Israeli Choreographer Oded Ronen, the Dance Students of the University of Ghana, the National Dance Company, the Great African Heritage Ensemble and the Ghana Dance Ensemble. It explored the myriad of movement systems that were developed to highlight the purpose for building bridges to bring Ghana and Israel together. The piece also highlighted individual struggles and passion, and the collective power of working together.

The night also witnessed symbolic individual pieces like Oded Ronen’s solo “Whale Dream” and Kofi Anthonio’s “Tribute”, a piece in honour of Ghana’s illustrious son, Emeritus Professor J. H. Nketia. 

In a media interaction, H. E. Shani Cooper, Israeli Ambassador to Ghana, Liberian and Sierra Leone expressed that “when we understand each other through movement and dance, it helps us to understand each other politically as two states and two people.” 

On his part, Dr. Sylvanus Kwashie Kuwor, Head of Department for the University of Ghana Dance Department explained that, the performance sought to promote community existence and international cohesion. According to him, the Dance Department will through this collaboration, establish a module that could be used to enhance international relations on the cultural level.

From Monday, 11 to Saturday, 16 March, the Embassy of Israel in collaboration with the University of Ghana Dance Department for the first time, hosted a festival of dance in Accra dubbed, Israel-Ghana Dance Bridges Week. The week celebrated traditional, folk and contemporary dance acts with Israeli & Ghanaian dancers. It created an atmosphere of commonalities between the Israeli culture and the Ghanaian culture through dance. The week captured Israeli-Ghanaian dance performance such as Capsule by Oded Ronen and Ligal Melamed; Israel-Ghana folk dance with Chen Laimer and the Kunsun Dance Ensemble; as well as a movie screening on Israeli contemporary dance.

Oded Ronen: Ye
Si
Gesher

23 March, 2019

Source: Ghana Web

We will continue to build a strong relationship with Ghana – Israeli Ambassador

Israel’s Ambassador to Ghana, Shani Cooper has assured Ghanaians of her country’s commitment to building stronger ties with Ghana in diverse sectors of the economy.

She says the Israeli embassy will continue to work towards strengthen relations between the two countries

Shani Cooper was speaking at the climax of the Israel-Ghana week of dance bridges held at Efua Sutherland drama studio at the University of Ghana campus.

The ambassador noted that the week-long event was intended to serve as a platform for liaison between the Ghanaian government and the Israeli government in diverse sectors of the economy.

“We will both do it culturally, people to people, on academic level, on business level and also on political level. We’re working on all levels to have these two great nations coming together and building stronger relationships.”

She further explained in a media interaction that, the seven-day event captured Israeli-Ghanaian dance performances such as Capsula by Oded Ronen and Ligal Melamed as well as the Israel-Ghana folk dance with Chen Laimer and the Kunsun Dance Ensemble.

These dances were meant to highlight the collective power of working together to “build a bridge between two the cultures and also build a language of movement that will connect between Israel and Ghana”.

From Monday, 11 to Saturday, 16 March, the Embassy of Israel collaborated with the University of Ghana Dance Department and the National Dance Company for the first time to host a festival of dance in Accra dubbed, Israel-Ghana Dance Bridges Week.